ABC Industry Advisory on Cannabis and Alcoholic Beverages

Introduction

The legalization of recreational cannabis has given us new information about the effects of combining this substance with alcohol.

On December 16, 2019, the federal government legalized recreational cannabis across Canada.

The federal government has legalized recreational cannabis across Canada. As a result, many provinces and territories have established regulations for the sale and distribution of cannabis products for adult use.

With the legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada, there are new challenges for businesses to navigate. This advisory explains how ABC members can ensure that they comply with all applicable laws when selling or distributing alcohol in provinces where recreational cannabis is legal. allen plus

We’ve been asked questions about cannabis and its legal status since that day.

You’re probably wondering what the legal status of cannabis is. Well, it depends on where you live!

In Canada, recreational use of cannabis will become legal on October 17th (with some caveats). But in the United States and many other countries around the world, its use remains illegal at a federal level and state-by-state.

Cannabis is now legal for recreational use in Canada and can be legally purchased from retailers licensed by provincial authorities in each province and territory.

You can now legally purchase cannabis from retailers licensed by provincial authorities in each province and territory. Cannabis can only be legally purchased in Canada, it is not legal to buy or sell it in any other way.

Cannabis remains illegal to buy or sell in other ways – for example, over the internet or from individuals who are not authorized to sell it.

Cannabis remains illegal to buy or sell in other ways – for example, over the internet or from individuals who are not authorized to sell it.

If you purchase cannabis illegally, you may be subject to fines and penalties.

Cannabis is also still illegal to buy or sell without an appropriate license in some provinces and territories that have chosen to prohibit or restrict its sale.

The ABC is advising licensees that cannabis is still illegal to buy or sell without an appropriate license in some provinces and territories that have chosen to prohibit or restrict its sale.

Additionally, certain restrictions on packaging and promotion apply to cannabis products everywhere in Canada.

Furthermore, certain restrictions on packaging and promotion apply to cannabis products everywhere in Canada.

Cannabis products cannot be packaged in a way that is appealing to children. For example, they must not have cartoon characters or bright colours, nor advertise the presence of alcohol, tobacco or caffeine (or their use). They also cannot be sold in packaging that has been used previously for another product, such as a cigarette pack.

Cannabis advertising is subject to the same rules that apply to alcohol advertising: it cannot promote excessive consumption or depict situations where using cannabis could result in harm or injury (such as driving under its influence).

Along with that legalization has come a rise in research about how cannabis affects the body, including what happens when cannabis is combined with alcohol.

Along with that legalization has come a rise in research about how cannabis affects the body, including what happens when cannabis is combined with alcohol. It turns out that pot and booze do mix, but not always in the ways you might expect.

Cannabis and alcohol both affect the brain—but they affect it differently. In fact, many people who use both substances actually report feeling calmer when they’re also using marijuana because it can help to mitigate some of alcohol’s effects on your body and mind (like slurred speech). However, there are other ways that mixing cannabis and alcohol can be dangerous:

  • If you smoke weed before drinking too much alcohol — or if you have a high tolerance for either substance — it may seem like you don’t need as much booze to get buzzed. But that’s not necessarily true! Mixing these two things could mean an increased risk of impaired driving or even death from alcohol poisoning due to lowered inhibitions.
  • With all these risks in mind, think carefully about whether or not to add another drug into your system before deciding whether or not you should “do shots.”

The information we have so far suggests that combining alcohol and cannabis can lead to negative effects like impaired driving, memory loss and nausea.

The information we have so far suggests that combining alcohol and cannabis can lead to negative effects like impaired driving, memory loss and nausea. Research has also shown that people who mix cannabis with alcohol show greater impairment than those who use either substance alone.

It’s important to remember that these effects are dose-dependent (meaning they increase as the amount of THC consumed increases). In addition, the combination of alcohol and cannabis is likely to vary depending on your weight and tolerance level – so you may be more susceptible than other people!

If you’re planning on consuming both substances at the same time (or at different times), it’s important you know how much THC you’re taking in before mixing them with any other substances.

Conclusion

We know that many of you are anxious about the impact cannabis may have on your business. We hope this information has helped to answer some of those questions and give you a better understanding of what’s happening in Canada right now.

# Title of content: What is an industry advisory?

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Must Read